[My latest review, detailing BOAT and BriTANick at the Eureka Theater, one of my favorite shows of all time.]

laughspin:

(via Tenacious D opens SF Sketchfest with stories, laughs and rock)

Courting Barbary: Day One (8/9/2013)

There’s too much pressure to have fun at Outside Lands. It’s is ground zero for art, culture, and astounding prices, celebrated over three days, currently in its sixth year. Many musicians and exhibitions litter the Golden Gate Park glens, but none are as important — for the purposes of this blog — as the Barbary tent. Ostensibly a comedy club, co-curated by SF Sketchfest, the parlor amplifies glade giggles like the historic Comedy Day, hopped up on steroids and Aderall.

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Product Review: “Moshe Kasher: Live in Oakland”

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2012 was undoubtedly a watershed year for Moshe Kasher. An Oakland-grown street punk, turned decorated stand-up performer, Kasher dominated the year beginning with the release of a memoir — Kasher in the Rye — and concluding with a weekend at his home club, the San Francisco Punch Line. In the midst of his accomplishments he released “Moshe Kasher: Live in Oakland” through Netflix, his first stand-up offering since 2009’s “Everyone You Know Is Going To Die, And Then You Are! (Unless You Die First)”. And while the ambitiously long-titled primary offering represents a career on the rise, ‘Live in Oakland’ demonstrates a relative apex, Moshe Kasher 2.0.

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hellogiggles:

GUSHING OVER AISHA TYLER’S ‘SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS’
by Rachael Berkey
http://bit.ly/141fQyA

[A passionate mini-review of “Self-Inflicted Wounds” by SF’s Aisha Tyler, one of the world’s most erudite and eloquent minds. I look forward to reading Tyler’s memoir, now a little bit more after reading Berkey’s spiel.]

hellogiggles:

GUSHING OVER AISHA TYLER’S ‘SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS’

by Rachael Berkey

[A passionate mini-review of “Self-Inflicted Wounds” by SF’s Aisha Tyler, one of the world’s most erudite and eloquent minds. I look forward to reading Tyler’s memoir, now a little bit more after reading Berkey’s spiel.]

Courting Sketchfest: Huffington Post’s “A Week at San Francisco Sketchfest” by Tony Bartolone

During my week in San Francisco, there were so many tantalizing events it was hard to decide what to see. The 12th Annual Sf Sketchfest was an ambitious undertaking, featuring 166 shows, lasting three and a half weeks and showcasing some of the best talent performing today. Here is my sample-platter of this year’s SF Sketchfest.

Part I

&

Part II

All in all, SF Sketchfest 2013 was a great, big grab bag of laughs featuring a variety of memorable events and dynamic performances. There’s nothing quite like live comedy, and SF Sketchfest definitely does it right.

San Francisco Bay Guardian’s Nicole Gluckstern writes a damn good article on her experiences with Mission music, including a description of the latest rollicking, full-house iteration of Hand to Mouth.

(Source: handtomouthcomedy)

Blog Love!: jessicalanglois “A Side of Feminism with that Fart Joke”

jessicalanglois:

The first sketch of local comedy group Femikaze’s Summer’s Eve showcase, “Go Fuck Yourself,” sets the mood for the evening. A girl asks her mom what do if a boy doesn’t like the way she maintains things down there, and the mom (Carinne Salnave), stirring a bowl of cake batter balanced on her hip, advises her daughter in über wholesome, after-school-special style to give that fellow a health dose of — you guessed it! — Go Fuck Yourself. Aaaaaand, we’re off and running.

In its current show, playing this weekend at Subterranean Art House, Femikaze delivers all the favorites—fart jokes, social media cracks, reality TV spoofs, F-bombs, infomercials, drunkenness—but with a fresh, feminist perspective that isn’t didactic, clichéd, or overwrought. The supershort sketches, performed by diverse cast of women, are just twisted enough to keep us hungrily clinging to each line. Pushing the “radical notion that women are funny,” Femikaze, founded by comedians Kelly Anneken and Isa Hopkins, not only intends to but actually does “create opportunities in comedy for self-identified women of all shapes, sizes, kinds, and colors.”

When I saw a sketch called “Peer Pinterest” in the program, I’ll admit, I was at first dubious, doubtful there were any new takes left on social media criticism. But the writers shifted the paradigm and kept it timely and local. A woman (Kristen Macaulay) who has just sprained her ankle after slipping in human feces (per last week’s story in the Chronicle on the ‘sheer volume of human waste’ found in the escalators) enters the BART station to find her friend and everyone else on the platform more interested in retweeting a Twitter star’s quips than hearing her malodorous story.

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