If I don’t do this, right now, I will be murdered by Juan Medina. I said that I’d cover his brainchild—the PM Show with Juan Medina—and I’ve been going through some shit, but I’m oddly optimistic about comedy at the moment SO HERE. WE. GO!
The PM Show with Juan Medina is a glorious commercial for effort. There’s free beer and food, a jazz band (the time I attended), a pop up Japanese game show (with Scott Simpson), a hilarious sidekick (Jesse Hett, again, the time I attended), and host Juan, culling all that together while experimenting wildly with hats and voices (i.e. characters). For all the energy and tangible—if not awkward—success, the one thing the show needs is patronage, a money holder, a big bucks supporter. All the tenates of a truely novel San Francisco is there, and I could imagine classyish twentysomethings really getting a kick out of the frenetic energy (and muscle-relaxing jazz). Alas, the PM Show continues its run without the attention it deserves, from the press, from its intended audience, and, ultimately from you. 

The show takes place the fourth Friday of the month in the Grotto performance space in the Sports Basement at 1590 Bryant St. San Francisco, Ca. This show is free & features free beer (21+ with valid id) Doors at 6, show at 6:30. 

If I don’t do this, right now, I will be murdered by Juan Medina. I said that I’d cover his brainchild—the PM Show with Juan Medina—and I’ve been going through some shit, but I’m oddly optimistic about comedy at the moment SO HERE. WE. GO!

The PM Show with Juan Medina is a glorious commercial for effort. There’s free beer and food, a jazz band (the time I attended), a pop up Japanese game show (with Scott Simpson), a hilarious sidekick (Jesse Hett, again, the time I attended), and host Juan, culling all that together while experimenting wildly with hats and voices (i.e. characters). For all the energy and tangible—if not awkward—success, the one thing the show needs is patronage, a money holder, a big bucks supporter. All the tenates of a truely novel San Francisco is there, and I could imagine classyish twentysomethings really getting a kick out of the frenetic energy (and muscle-relaxing jazz). Alas, the PM Show continues its run without the attention it deserves, from the press, from its intended audience, and, ultimately from you. 

The show takes place the fourth Friday of the month in the Grotto performance space in the Sports Basement at 1590 Bryant St. San Francisco, Ca. This show is free & features free beer (21+ with valid id) Doors at 6, show at 6:30. 

[Erika Star shares her favorite features of the fest including Mary Van Note, Nancy and Beth, and Lydia Popovich.]

Picture This!, the amicable marriage of sight, sound and more sight just made it’s San Francisco debut hours ago at the Dark Room Theater. Concocted in Los Angeles by comedian Brandie Posey and animator Sam Varela, the show paired stand-up comedians with illustrators, each performing their due diligence to visualize this crazy thing called funny.

[My latest review for Spinning Platters covering the Don’t Watch This Show Live! (dwtslive) and Femikaze (femikaze) show hosted by Jules Posner at the Eureka Theater on 1/27/2014]

laughspin:

(via Tenacious D opens SF Sketchfest with stories, laughs and rock)

Written by Jazmine Hill.

Show Review: The Business 4 Year Anniversary (4/17/2013)

It’s t-minus fifteen minutes. The audience remains translucent. 49-seats of emptiness connects two pools of light. In the lobby Wigglesworth, nicest cyberpirate, watches the door with French bulldog, Wellington, lazily laying nearby. Across the moody, barren strait, a smattering of chattery, the loudest voice belonging to Bucky Sinister.

Bucky has probably heard some offensive assumptions: stocky, tattooed, downplayed dapper with freshly cut, slick hair. In the avocado-green room, with suspended livery and hoarded horrors, the sensitive badass is a kingly raconteur, bouncing lively in badinage with two of the night’s guests, neighborhood chocolatiers.

The Daily Show, local anti-political performance art, pranks. A rich colloquial confluence of rolling anecdotes from legitimately interesting San Franciscans with one exception. Nato Green, native through in through, slinks into a sleeve of his own design, iPhoning with a casual aloofness. “Do we have two mic[rophones] ready?” Nato leaks. Bucky exits to check, leaving Green to pre-interview with ebbing/flowing soccerdadcoach excitability.

Sean Keane arrives ‘round eight, complimented on his “Let It Be” McCartney-ness before being whisked away by the natural chaos of live production. Comedy isn’t glitz, it is gridiron exhibitions containing a lot of audibles. Caitlin Gill arrives. It’s t-plus eighteen minutes. In a matter of thirty minutes the once husky belly of the Dark Room Theater is now paunchy and groaning. Baron Vaughn — “Way less famous than he should be,” spouts Nato — is running late, and everyone seems even keel about it. Hasn’t anybody told the showrunners that it’s their fourth anniversary, an occasion worthy of silk, flowers or at least punctuality? Why does everything seem like business as unusual?

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Show Review: “Mute Defiance” @ Stage Werx Theater (4/12/2013)

Endgames Improv does stuff. Also, they do it well. They’ve been doing it well for years and the city of San Francisco is made better by their exploits. On Friday, April 12, 2013, the group, known for divergent decisions and experimentation, presented Mute Defiance at the Stage Werx theater, a handsome, twilit proscenium. Improv actors set to challenge television by assimilating, by becoming one, by layering live intonations against projected programming, utilizing Netflix, the ubiquitous, quirky, dorky hamlet of entertainment, resulting in post-production puppetry.

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Show Review: Fucking Funny (1/18/2013)

House shows are the best shows. Every time the elegant edifice of modern comedy is torn from it’s standard, swarmy platforms — bars, clubs, theaters — and moved to naturalistic, “acoustic” settings, the best of the medium infuses with the luxury of living [rooms]. They are a temporal hybrid of contemporary DIY, boundless work ethic and the risque bawdiness of party record listening parties circa 1970s. These culture clusters’ significance are inasmuch undetermined and largely undocumented. Underground, tantalizing, scandalous, pivotal: parlors of the BYOBrood, with low expectations and high anticipation, are the gunpowder for unbelievably special moments within uncanny circumstance.

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San Francisco Bay Guardian’s Nicole Gluckstern writes a damn good article on her experiences with Mission music, including a description of the latest rollicking, full-house iteration of Hand to Mouth.

(Source: handtomouthcomedy)